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Free Kindle eBooks | History & Philosophy |

Showing Free eBook 1-30 of 49
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Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

A History of Force Feeding: Hunger Strikes, Prisons and Medical Ethics, 1909–1974

by Ian Miller

This book is Open Access under a CC BY license. It is the first monograph-length study of the force-feeding of hunger strikers in English, Irish and Northern Irish prisons. It examines ethical debates that arose throughout the twentieth century when governments authorised the force-feeding of imprisoned suffragettes, Irish republicans and convict prisoners. It also explores the fraught role of prison doctors called upon to perform the procedure. Since the Home Office first authorised force-feeding in 1909, a number of questions have been raised about the procedure. Is force-feeding safe? Can it kill? Are doctors who feed prisoners against their will abandoning the medical ethical norms of their profession? And do state bodies use prison doctors to help tackle political dissidence at times of political crisis?

Genre: History, Nonfiction, Science & Maths, History & Philosophy
Size: 267 pages
Free download for Kindle from 25 February 2020 onward  

Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

Renaissance Futurities: Science, Art, Invention

by Charlene Villaseñor Black

Genre: Arts & Photography, Art, History, Europe, Science & Maths, History & Philosophy
Size: 256 pages
Free download for Kindle from 24 February 2020 onward  

Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

The Eclipse of the Modern Mind: The First Contact

by JP Gough

Genre: Science & Maths, History & Philosophy
Size: 146 pages
Free download for Kindle from 23 February 2020 onward  

Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

Everything Flows: Towards a Processual Philosophy of Biology

by Daniel J. Nicholson

This is an open access title available under the terms of a CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International licence. It is free to read at Oxford Scholarship Online and offered as a free PDF download from OUP and selected open access locations.Everything Flows explores the metaphysical thesis that the living world is not made up of substantial particles or things, as has often been supposed, but is rather constituted by processes. The biological domain is organised as an interdependent hierarchy of processes, which are stabilized and actively maintained at different timescales. Even entities that intuitively appear to be paradigms of things, such as organisms, are actually better understood as processes. Unlike previousattempts to articulate processual views of biology, which have tended to use Alfred North Whitehead's panpsychist metaphysics as a foundation, this book takes a naturalistic approach to metaphysics. It submits that the main motivations for replacing an ontology of substances with one of processes are to be foundin the empirical findings of science. Biology provides compelling reasons for thinking that the living realm is fundamentally dynamic, and that the existence of things is always conditional on the existence of processes. The phenomenon of life cries out for theories that prioritise processes over things, and it suggests that the central explanandum of biology is not change but rather stability, or more precisely, stability attained through constant change. This edited volume brings togetherphilosophers of science and metaphysicians interested in exploring the prospects of a processual philosophy of biology. The contributors draw on an extremely wide range of biological case studies, and employ a process perspective to cast new light on a number of traditional philosophical problems, suchas identity, persistence, and individuality.

Genre: Nonfiction, Politics & Social Sciences, Philosophy, Science & Maths, Biological Sciences, History & Philosophy
Size: 416 pages
Free download for Kindle from 18 February 2020 onward  

Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

Louis Agassiz as a Teacher: Illustrative Extracts on His Method of Instruction

by Lane Cooper

Genre: Biography & True Accounts, Professionals & Academics, Education & Reference, Education, Science & Maths, History & Philosophy
Size: 52 pages
Free download for Kindle from 10 February 2020 onward  

Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

Model-Based Demography: Essays on Integrating Data, Technique and Theory (Demographic Research Monographs)

by Thomas K. Burch

Late in a career of more than sixty years, Thomas Burch, an internationally known social demographer, undertook a wide-ranging methodological critique of demography. This open access volume contains a selection of resulting papers, some previously unpublished, some published but not readily accessible [from past meetings of The International Union for the Scientific Study of Population and its research committees, or from other small conferences and seminars]. Rejecting the idea that demography is simply a branch of applied statistics, his work views it as an autonomous and complete scientific discipline. When viewed from the perspective of modern philosophy of science, specifically the semantic or model-based school, demography is a balanced discipline, with a rich body of techniques and data, but also with more and better theories than generally recognized. As demonstrated in this book, some demographic techniques can also be seen as theoretical models, and some substantive/behavioral models, commonly rejected as theory because of inconsistent observations, are now seen as valuable theoretical models, for example demographic transition theory.  This book shows how demography can build a strong theoretical edifice on its broad and deep empirical foundation by adoption of the model-based approach to science. But the full-fruits of this approach will require demographers to make greater use of computer modeling [both macro- and micro-simulation], in the statement and manipulation of theoretical ideas, as well as for numerical computation. This book is open access under a CC BY license.

Genre: Nonfiction, Politics & Social Sciences, Social Sciences, Science & Maths, History & Philosophy
Size: 200 pages
Free download for Kindle from 10 February 2020 onward  

Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

Making Medicines in Africa: The Political Economy of Industrializing for Local Health (International Political Economy Series)

by Maureen Mackintosh

This book is open access under a CC-BY license. The importance of the pharmaceutical industry in Sub-Saharan Africa, its claim to policy priority, is rooted in the vast unmet health needs of the sub-continent. Making Medicines in Africa is a collective endeavour, by a group of contributors with a strong African and more broadly Southern presence, to find ways to link technological development, investment and industrial growth in pharmaceuticals to improve access to essential good quality medicines, as part of moving towards universal access to competent health care in Africa. The authors aim to shift the emphasis in international debate and initiatives towards sustained Africa-based and African-led initiatives to tackle this huge challenge. Without the technological, industrial, intellectual, organisational and research-related capabilities associated with competent pharmaceutical production, and without policies that pull the industrial sectors towards serving local health needs, the African sub-continent cannot generate the resources to tackle its populations' needs and demands.

Genre: Business & Finance, Economics, Industries & Professions, Professional & Technical, Medicine, Nonfiction, Politics & Social Sciences, Social Sciences, International, Education & Reference, Science & Maths, History & Philosophy, Physics
Size: 360 pages
Free download for Kindle from 06 February 2020 onward  

Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

The Challenge of Chance: A Multidisciplinary Approach from Science and the Humanities (The Frontiers Collection)

by Klaas Landsman

Genre: Professional & Technical, Medicine, Nonfiction, Politics & Social Sciences, Philosophy, Self-Help & Counselling, Psychology, Science & Maths, Behavioural Sciences, History & Philosophy, Mathematics, Physics
Size: 276 pages
Free download for Kindle from 06 February 2020 onward  

Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

Animals and the Shaping of Modern Medicine: One Health and its Histories (Medicine and Biomedical Sciences in Modern History)

by Abigail Woods

Genre: History, World, Professional & Technical, Medicine, Nonfiction, Science & Maths, History & Philosophy, Nature & Ecology
Size: 280 pages
Free download for Kindle from 03 February 2020 onward  

Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

Melting Hadrons, Boiling Quarks - From Hagedorn Temperature to Ultra-Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions at CERN: With a Tribute to Rolf Hagedorn

by Johann Rafelski

This book shows how the study of multi-hadron production phenomena in the years after the founding of CERN culminated in Hagedorn's pioneering idea of limiting temperature, leading on to the discovery of the quark-gluon plasma -- announced, in February 2000 at CERN.Following the foreword by Herwig Schopper -- the Director General  (1981-1988) of CERN at the key historical juncture -- the first part is a tribute to Rolf Hagedorn (1919-2003) and includes contributions by contemporary friends and colleagues, and those who were most touched by Hagedorn: Tamás Biró, Igor Dremin, Torleif Ericson, Marek Gaździcki, Mark Gorenstein, Hans Gutbrod, Maurice Jacob, István Montvay, Berndt Müller, Grazyna Odyniec, Emanuele Quercigh,  Krzysztof Redlich, Helmut  Satz, Luigi Sertorio, Ludwik Turko, and Gabriele Veneziano.The second and third parts retrace 20 years of developments that after discovery of the Hagedorn temperature in 1964 led to its recognition as the melting point of hadrons into boiling quarks, and  to the rise of the experimental relativistic heavy ion collision program. These parts contain previously unpublished material authored by Hagedorn and Rafelski: conference retrospectives, research notes, workshop reports, in some instances abbreviated to avoid duplication of material, and rounded off with the editor's explanatory notes.About the editor:  Johann Rafelski is a theoretical physicist working at The University of Arizona in Tucson, USA. Born in 1950 in Krakow, Poland, he received his Ph.D. with Walter Greiner in Frankfurt, Germany in 1973.  Rafelski arrived at CERN in 1977, where in a joint effort with Hagedorn he contributed greatly to the establishment of the relativistic heavy ion collision, and quark-gluon plasma research fields. Moving on, with stops in Frankfurt and Cape Town, to Arizona, he invented and developed the strangeness quark flavor as the signature of quark-gluon plasma.

Genre: Nonfiction, Science & Maths, History & Philosophy, Physics
Size: 441 pages
Free download for Kindle from 01 February 2020 onward  

Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

Environments of Intelligence: From natural information to artificial interaction (History and Philosophy of Technoscience)

by Hajo Greif

Genre: History, Nonfiction, Politics & Social Sciences, Philosophy, Professional & Technical, Technology & Engineering, Self-Help & Counselling, Psychology, Science & Maths, Behavioural Sciences, History & Philosophy
Size: 230 pages
Free download for Kindle from 30 January 2020 onward  

Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

Building Green: Environmental Architects and the Struggle for Sustainability in Mumbai

by Anne Rademacher

A free ebook version of this title is available through Luminos, University of California Press’s Open Access publishing program. Visit www.luminosoa.org to learn more.Building Green explores the experience of environmental architects in Mumbai, one of the world’s most populous and population-dense urban areas and a city iconic for its massive informal settlements, extreme wealth asymmetries, and ecological stresses. Under these conditions, what does it mean to learn, and try to practice, so-called green design? By tracing the training and professional experiences of environmental architects in India’s first graduate degree program in Environmental Architecture, Rademacher shows how environmental architects forged sustainability concepts and practices and sought to make them meaningful through engaged architectural practice. The book’s focus on practitioners offers insights into the many roles that converge to produce this emergent, critically important form of urban expertise. At once activists, scientists, and designers, the environmental architects profiled in Building Green act as key agents of urban change whose efforts in practice are shaped by a complex urban development economy, layered political power relations, and a calculus of when, and how, their expert skills might be operationalized in service of a global urban future.  

Genre: Arts & Photography, Architecture, Nonfiction, Professional & Technical, Technology & Engineering, Politics & Social Sciences, Social Sciences, Science & Maths, History & Philosophy
Size: 224 pages
Free download for Kindle from 30 January 2020 onward  

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Rating: 5.00 / 5
1 review

Cognition Switch #6

by Carl Zimmer

Cognition Switch: An Artefact for the Transmission of New IdeasIssue #6: June 2019Featuring Ideas by:Alex O’Brien, Hayley Birch, Catherine de Lange, Carl Zimmer, Moheb Costandi, Virginia Gewin, Emma Young, Samira Shackle, and Kendall Powell

Genre: Politics & Social Sciences, Philosophy, Social Sciences, Science & Maths, History & Philosophy
Size: 157 pages
Free download for Kindle from 10 February 2020 onward  

Rating: 5.00 / 5
1 review

The Revolution That Hasn’t Happened Weinberg & Kuhn’s scheme

by Omega Philosophy and Science Series

In his book “The Revolution that didn’t happen” Steven Weinberg argues that Kuhn’s scheme cannot properly describe modern developments in physics and that there has not been a scientific revolution in this field in the 20th or 21st century. I agree with both of Weinberg’s claims, but I disagree with his premise in both cases. I propose an account of Relativity Theory and Quantum Physics indicating a coexistence of two paradigms. I suggest that modern developments in physics underline the necessity of a wide approach to the concept of paradigm, but a proper model of their philosophical implications is lacking. It is concluded that modern physics can not be adequately explained applying a cumulative description.

Genre: Science & Maths, History & Philosophy
Size: 42 pages
Free download for Kindle from 04 February 2020 onward  

Rating: 5.00 / 5
1 review

The Origin of Species

by Charles Darwin

This is the sixth and definitive edition of Charles Darwin’s The Origin of Species, originally published in 1859 as The Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection; Or The Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggles for Life. In his famous work, Darwin presents the theory that populations evolve over the course of generations through the process of natural selection.

Genre: Nonfiction, Science & Maths, Biological Sciences, Genetics, History & Philosophy
Size: Unknown
Free download for Kindle from 03 February 2020 onward  

Rating: 4.10 / 5
4 reviews

A History of Self-Harm in Britain: A Genealogy of Cutting and Overdosing (Mental Health in Historical Perspective)

by Chris Millard

This book is open access under a CC BY license and is the first account of self-harming behaviour in its proper historical and political context. The rise of self-cutting and overdosing in the 20th century is linked to the sweeping changes in mental and physical health, and wider political context. The welfare state, social work, Second World War, closure of the asylums, even the legalization of suicide, are all implicated in the prominence of self harm in Britain. The rise of 'overdosing as a cry for help' is linked to the integration of mental and physical healthcare, the NHS, and the change in the law on suicide and attempted suicide. The shift from overdosing to self-cutting as the most prominent 'self-damaging' behaviour is also explained, linked to changes in hospital organization and the wider rise of neoliberal politics. Appreciation of history and politics is vital to understanding the psychological concerns over these self-harming behaviours.

Genre: History, Europe, UK, World, Professional & Technical, Medicine, Nonfiction, Politics & Social Sciences, Social Sciences, Science & Maths, History & Philosophy
Size: 280 pages
Free download for Kindle from 30 January 2020 onward  

Rating: 4.00 / 5
4 reviews

Punishing the Criminal Corpse, 1700-1840: Aggravated Forms of the Death Penalty in England (Palgrave Historical Studies in the Criminal Corpse and its Afterlife)

by Peter King

This book is open access under a CC BY 4.0 licence. This book analyses the different types of post-execution punishments and other aggravated execution practices, the reasons why they were advocated, and the decision, enshrined in the Murder Act of 1752, to make two post-execution punishments, dissection and gibbeting, an integral part of sentences for murder. It traces the origins of the Act, and then explores the ways in which Act was actually put into practice. After identifying the dominance of penal dissection throughout the period, it looks at the abandonment of burning at the stake in the 1790s, the rapid decline of hanging in chains just after 1800, and the final abandonment of both dissection and gibbeting in 1832 and 1834. It concludes that the Act, by creating differentiation in levels of penalty, played an important role within the broader capital punishment system well into the nineteenth century. While eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century historians have extensively studied the ‘Bloody Code’ and the resulting interactions around the ‘Hanging Tree’, they have largely ignored an important dimension of the capital punishment system – the courts extensive use of aggravated and post-execution punishments. With this book, Peter King aims to rectify this neglected historical phenomenon.

Genre: History, Europe, UK, Nonfiction, Professional & Technical, Law, Politics & Social Sciences, Social Sciences, Education & Reference, Science & Maths, History & Philosophy
Size: 212 pages
Free download for Kindle from 16 February 2020 onward  

Rating: 4.00 / 5
4 reviews

Constructions of Cancer in Early Modern England: Ravenous Natures (Palgrave Studies in Literature, Science and Medicine)

by Alanna Skuse

This book is open access under a CC-BY licence. Cancer is perhaps the modern world's most feared disease. Yet, we know relatively little about this malady's history before the nineteenth century. This book provides the first in-depth examination of perceptions of cancerous disease in early modern England. Looking to drama, poetry and polemic as well as medical texts and personal accounts, it contends that early modern people possessed an understanding of cancer which remains recognizable to us today. Many of the ways in which medical practitioners and lay people imagined cancer – as a 'woman's disease' or a 'beast' inside the body – remain strikingly familiar, and they helped to make this disease a byword for treachery and cruelty in discussions of religion, culture and politics. Equally, cancer treatments were among the era's most radical medical and surgical procedures. From buttered frog ointments to agonizing and dangerous surgeries, they raised abiding questions about the nature of disease and the proper role of the medical practitioner.

Genre: Fiction, History, Europe, World, Professional & Technical, Medicine, Nonfiction, Literary Criticism & Theory, Science & Maths, History & Philosophy
Size: 240 pages
Free download for Kindle from 14 February 2020 onward  

Rating: 4.00 / 5
4 reviews

A History of Male Psychological Disorders in Britain, 1945-1980 (Mental Health in Historical Perspective)

by Alison Haggett

This book is open access under a CC BY license.Statistically, women appear to suffer more frequently from depressive and anxiety disorders, featuring more regularly in primary care figures for consultations, diagnoses and prescriptions for psychotropic medication. This has been consistently so throughout the post-war period with current figures suggesting that women are approximately twice more likely to suffer from affective disorders than men. However, this book suggests that the statistical landscape reveals only part of the story. Currently, 75 per cent of suicides are among men, and this trend can also be traced back historically to data that suggests this has been the case since the beginning of the twentieth-century. This book suggests that male psychological illness was in fact no less common, but that it emerged in complex ways and was understood differently in response to prevailing cultural and medical forces. The book explores a host of medical, cultural and social factors that raise important questions about historical and current perceptions of gender and mental illness.

Genre: History, Europe, UK, World, Professional & Technical, Medicine, Nonfiction, Self-Help & Counselling, Psychology, Politics & Social Sciences, Social Sciences, Science & Maths, History & Philosophy
Size: 230 pages
Free download for Kindle from 31 January 2020 onward  

Rating: 4.00 / 5
1 review

Animal Attractions: Nature on Display in American Zoos

by Elizabeth Hanson

Genre: Science & Maths, History & Philosophy
Size: 288 pages
Free download for Kindle from 27 January 2020 onward  

Rating: 3.90 / 5
4 reviews

Investigating the Body in the Victorian Asylum: Doctors, Patients, and Practices (Mental Health in Historical Perspective)

by Jennifer Wallis

This book is open access under a CC BY 4.0 license.This book explores how the body was investigated in the late nineteenth-century asylum in Britain. As more and more Victorian asylum doctors looked to the bodily fabric to reveal the ‘truth’ of mental disease, a whole host of techniques and technologies were brought to bear upon the patient's body. These practices encompassed the clinical and the pathological, from testing the patient's reflexes to dissecting the brain. Investigating the Body in the Victorian Asylum takes a unique approach to the topic, conducting a chapter-by-chapter dissection of the body. It considers how asylum doctors viewed and investigated the skin, muscles, bones, brain, and bodily fluids. The book demonstrates the importance of the body in nineteenth-century psychiatry as well as how the asylum functioned as a site of research, and will be of value to historians of psychiatry, the body, and scientific practice.

Genre: History, Professional & Technical, Medicine, Nonfiction, Self-Help & Counselling, Psychology, Science & Maths, History & Philosophy
Size: 276 pages
Free download for Kindle from 12 February 2020 onward  

Rating: 3.40 / 5
3 reviews

The Golden and Ghoulish Age of the Gibbet in Britain (Palgrave Historical Studies in the Criminal Corpse and its Afterlife)

by Sarah Tarlow

This book is open access under a CC BY 4.0 licence. This book is the first academic study of the post-mortem practice of gibbeting (‘hanging in chains’), since the nineteenth century. Gibbeting involved placing the executed body of a malefactor in an iron cage and suspending it from a tall post. A body might remain in the gibbet for many decades, while it gradually fell to pieces. Hanging in chains was a very different sort of post-mortem punishment from anatomical dissection, although the two were equal alternatives in the eyes of the law. Where dissection obliterated and de-individualised the body, hanging in chains made it monumental and rooted it in the landscape, adding to personal notoriety. Focusing particularly on the period 1752-1832, this book provides a summary of the historical evidence, the factual history of gibbetting which explores the locations of gibbets, the material technologies involved in hanging in chains, and the actual process from erection to eventual collapse. It also considers the meanings, effects and legacy of this gruesome practice.

Genre: History, Europe, UK, Nonfiction, Politics & Social Sciences, Social Sciences, Education & Reference, Science & Maths, History & Philosophy
Size: 155 pages
Free download for Kindle from 04 February 2020 onward  

Rating: 3.20 / 5
5 reviews

Albert Einstein: Extraordinary Life Lessons That Will Change Your Life Forever (Inspirational Books)

by Jamie Cooper

*** Limited time offer ***


Unfortunately, you’ve fallen victim to the biggest lie out there: that creating a life of dreams is hard and nearly impossible. It’s nearly impossible because without the right connections, a good early education, and financial wealth to back you up, you might as well sit on the sidelines and fold your arms. When you have nothing going for you, when you have obligations to care of, shackling you to the ground (money doesn’t grow on trees), you might not even see the point in even starting, because creating a life of dreams must surely be for the 1%.

If you think creating a life desired is costly, you are right. It’s not easy. It requires dedication, a willingness to give up short-term satisfaction, and that means being prepared to give some of your happiness away for the greater long-term good. However, if that all sounds a bit too much – why would you want to sacrifice your happiness? – then you need to take a step back and foresee a different kind of outcome that will inevitably unfold if you take the road most taken: a future of unrealized potential, an underlying, constant inner-discomfort, and the most horrid of all, regret. And what is the road most taken? It’s the easy road out. It’s the road most people take in life, the one that appears comfortable and easy but is actually laden with nightmares and discomfort. If you’re ignoring your dreams to pursue something more acceptable or less risky, you are taking the road most taken.

Fortunately, there are things that you can do in life that will immediately snap you back to what is important: you and your magnificent potential. What is perhaps the most powerful tool of all that will help you get back on track? It’s learning from people who have gone beyond what is humanly thought possible, like Albert Einstein, a man who once thought he was worthless (who wrote a letter to his parents telling them that he should never have been born, because he’s useless), and who ended up being a legend among people, an inspiration who unlocked the very secrets of life.

There is so much love, power, and potential in you, that you don’t even realize it. Bring this side out by studying the great. When you study great leaders, like Albert Einstein, you are essentially absorbing their wisdom, something that will radically change your life not years from now, but now, the moment you start reading the coming chapters. What follows are the greatest life lessons from Albert Einstein, wisdom that can easily be applied to your own life. They were carefully selected and dissected in meaning to help you gain the most out of them.

There is a powerful reason why Albert Einstein was so great: because he was human, and he realized it. Scroll up and grab your copy today.


*** Limited time offer ***

Genre: Biography & True Accounts, Professionals & Academics, Specific Groups, Nonfiction, Science & Maths, History & Philosophy
Size: 30 pages
Free download for Kindle from 07 February 2020 onward  

Rating: 3.00 / 5
3 reviews

Methodological Investigations in Agent-Based Modelling: With Applications for the Social Sciences (Methodos Series Book 13)

by Eric Silverman

This open access book examines the methodological complications of using complexity science concepts within the social science domain.  The opening chapters take the reader on a tour through the development of simulation methodologies in the fields of artificial life and population biology, then demonstrates the growing popularity and relevance of these methods in the social sciences.  Following an in-depth analysis of the potential impact of these methods on social science and social theory, the text provides substantive examples of the application of agent-based models in the field of demography.  This work offers a unique combination of applied simulation work and substantive, in-depth philosophical analysis, and as such has potential appeal for specialist social scientists, complex systems scientists, and philosophers of science interested in the methodology of simulation and the practice of interdisciplinary computing research.

Genre: Computing, Microsoft, Nonfiction, Politics & Social Sciences, Philosophy, Social Sciences, Science & Maths, History & Philosophy
Size: 235 pages
Free download for Kindle from 19 February 2020 onward  

Rating: 3.00 / 5
3 reviews

Information—Consciousness—Reality: How a New Understanding of the Universe Can Help Answer Age-Old Questions of Existence (The Frontiers Collection)

by James B. Glattfelder

Genre: Politics & Social Sciences, Philosophy, Science & Maths, History & Philosophy, Physics
Size: 662 pages
Free download for Kindle from 13 February 2020 onward  

Rating: 3.00 / 5
3 reviews

Capital Punishment and the Criminal Corpse in Scotland, 1740–1834 (Palgrave Historical Studies in the Criminal Corpse and its Afterlife)

by Rachel E. Bennett

Genre: History, Europe, UK, Nonfiction, Politics & Social Sciences, Social Sciences, Science & Maths, History & Philosophy
Size: 237 pages
Free download for Kindle from 10 February 2020 onward  

Rating: 1.90 / 5
2 reviews

Physical (A)Causality: Determinism, Randomness and Uncaused Events (Fundamental Theories of Physics Book 192)

by Karl Svozil

This book is open access under a CC BY 4.0 license.This book addresses the physical phenomenon of events that seem to occur spontaneously and without any known cause. These are to be contrasted with events that happen in a (pre-)determined, predictable, lawful, and causal way. All our knowledge is based on self-reflexive theorizing, as well as on operational means of empirical perception. Some of the questions that arise are the following: are these limitations reflected by our models? Under what circumstances does chance kick in? Is chance in physics merely epistemic? In other words, do we simply not know enough, or use too crude levels of description for our predictions? Or are certain events "truly", that is, irreducibly, random? The book tries to answer some of these questions by introducing intrinsic, embedded observers and provable unknowns; that is, observables and procedures which are certified (relative to the assumptions) to be unknowable or undoable. A (somewhat iconoclastic) review of quantum mechanics is presented which is inspired by quantum logic. Postulated quantum (un-)knowables are reviewed. More exotic unknowns originate in the assumption of classical continua, and in finite automata and generalized urn models, which mimic complementarity and yet maintain value definiteness. Traditional conceptions of free will, miracles and dualistic interfaces are based on gaps in an otherwise deterministic universe. 

Genre: Nonfiction, Politics & Social Sciences, Philosophy, Science & Maths, History & Philosophy, Mathematics, Physics
Size: 219 pages
Free download for Kindle from 02 February 2020 onward  

Rating: 1.00 / 5
1 review

Belly-Rippers, Surgical Innovation and the Ovariotomy Controversy (Medicine and Biomedical Sciences in Modern History)

by Sally Frampton

Genre: History, Professional & Technical, Medicine, Nonfiction, Politics & Social Sciences, Social Sciences, Science & Maths, History & Philosophy
Size: Unknown
Free download for Kindle from 10 February 2020 onward  

Rating: 1.00 / 5
1 review

Dissecting the Criminal Corpse: Staging Post-Execution Punishment in Early Modern England (Palgrave Historical Studies in the Criminal Corpse and its Afterlife)

by Elizabeth T. Hurren

Those convicted of homicide were hanged on the public gallows before being dissected under the Murder Act in Georgian England. Yet, from 1752, whether criminals actually died on the hanging tree or in the dissection room remained a medical mystery in early modern society. Dissecting the Criminal Corpse takes issue with the historical cliché of corpses dangling from the hangman’s rope in crime studies. Some convicted murderers did survive execution in early modern England. Establishing medical death in the heart-lungs-brain was a physical enigma. Criminals had large bull-necks, strong willpowers, and hearty survival instincts. Extreme hypothermia often disguised coma in a prisoner hanged in the winter cold. The youngest and fittest were capable of reviving on the dissection table. Many died under the lancet. Capital legislation disguised a complex medical choreography that surgeons staged. They broke the Hippocratic Oath by executing the Dangerous Dead across England from 1752 until 1832. This book is open access under a CC-BY license. 

Genre: History, Europe, UK, Nonfiction, Politics & Social Sciences, Social Sciences, Science & Maths, History & Philosophy
Size: 326 pages
Free download for Kindle from 31 January 2020 onward  

Shaping Natural History and Settler Society: Mary Elizabeth Barber and the Nineteenth-Century Cape (Cambridge Imperial and Post-Colonial Studies Series)

by Tanja Hammel

This book explores the life and work of Mary Elizabeth Barber, a British-born settler scientist who lived in the Cape during the nineteenth century. It provides a lens into a range of subjects within the history of knowledge and science, gender and social history, postcolonial, critical heritage and archival studies. The book examines the international importance of the life and works of a marginalized scientist, the instrumentalisation of science to settlers' political concerns and reveals the pivotal but largely silenced contribution of indigenous African experts. Including a variety of material, visual and textual sources, this study explores how these artefacts are archived and displayed in museums and critically analyses their content and silences. The book traces Barber’s legacy across three continents in collections and archives, offering insights into the politics of memory and history-making. At the same time, it forges a nuanced argument, incorporating study of the North and South, the history of science and social history, and the past and the present.

Genre: History, Africa, Politics & Social Sciences, Social Sciences, Science & Maths, History & Philosophy
Size: 360 pages
Free download for Kindle from 23 February 2020 onward  

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